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High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite

Processes to add metal hydrideds to nanocarbon structures to yield high capacity hydrogen storage materials

Savannah River National Laboratory

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Plot of Number of hydrogen atoms per lithium atom vs the Mol ratio of C<sub>60</sub>:Li.&nbsp; An ratio of 1:6 (C<sub>60</sub>:Li) achieved the highest H<sub>2</sub> capacity (5.0%).
Plot of Number of hydrogen atoms per lithium atom vs the Mol ratio of C60:Li.  An ratio of 1:6 (C60:Li) achieved the highest H2 capacity (5.0%).

TGA-RGA comparison of the 3<sup>rd </sup>desorptionof the Li:H:C<sub>60 </sub>(6:1) composite (as prepared-blue and rehydrided-black) and hydrofullerene (red).&nbsp; The materials were hydrogenerated at 350<sup>o</sup>C under 105 bar H<sup>2</sup>.
TGA-RGA comparison of the 3rd desorptionof the Li:H:C60 (6:1) composite (as prepared-blue and rehydrided-black) and hydrofullerene (red).  The materials were hydrogenerated at 350oC under 105 bar H2.

Technology Marketing Summary

Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Hydrogen Research Center have developed new processes to add metal hydrides to nanocarbon structures to yield high capacity hydrogen storage materials.  Testing of these materials has shown that hyrdogen can be efficiently absorbed and released in multiple cycles and in significant quantities.  Processes to add Lithium Hydride to Fullerenes have resulted in structures that can retain and release significant quantities of hydrogen at lower temperatures and pressure.

Description

Hydrofullerenes (C60H60) are theoretical capacity of 7.7 weight percent Hydrogen.  Previous attempts to load hydrogen to a fullerene structure have been at 6 weight percent.  A disadvantage to hydrofullerenes is that requires temperatures in excess of 500 degrees Celsius to desorb the hydrogen with damage to the fullerene structure.  Scientists at SRNL have developed new processes using metal hydrides to develop materials where the hydrogen can be absorbed and released with greater efficiency.

Benefits
  • H2 absorption/desorption at 5.0 weight percent
  • significant quantities of H2 at lower temp and pressure
  • storage is reversible
  • patent pending
Applications and Industries

A wide range of applications in the area of energy storage  are industries such as automotive, portable power, stationary power sources and backup power systems.

Technology Status
Technology IDDevelopment StageAvailabilityPublishedLast Updated
SRNL-L5210-2011-00147DevelopmentAvailable - This technology is for license. Please contact Commercialization Mgr. for licensing information.06/21/201106/21/2011

Contact SRNL About This Technology

To: Dale Haas, Commercialization Manager<dale.haas@srnl.doe.gov>