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Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions

Brookhaven National Laboratory

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<p>
	Schematic illustration of a nanocrystal bulk heterojunction solar cell with an active layer in which the concentration of n-type and p-type nanocrystals is graded across the device.</p>

Schematic illustration of a nanocrystal bulk heterojunction solar cell with an active layer in which the concentration of n-type and p-type nanocrystals is graded across the device.

Technology Marketing Summary

Photovoltaic devices can be made of inorganic materials, such as silicon or cadmium telluride, or organics, like conducting polymers. In general, inorganic materials perform better while organics are much cheaper to produce. These fully inorganic nanocrystal bulk heterojunction devices combine the power conversion oefficience of inorganic photovoltaic cells with the inexpensive and scalable processing methods of organics, e.g., dip-coating and spin-coating.

Description

Suspensions of p- and n-type nanocrystals in organic solvents are dip- or spin-coated onto substrates. If desired, the process can be repeated with suspensions of different compositions to form a graded layer bulk heterojunction. To avoid shorting, hole- and/or electron-blocking layers may be deposited at the contacts. The resulting inorganic nanocrystal bulk heterojunction may be used as a photovoltaic device for solar cells and other photosensitive devices.

Benefits

Inorganic nanocrystal bulk heterojunction photovoltaics offer lower production costs than silicon, increased robustness compared to organic photovoltaics, and compositional tunability leading to higher power conversion efficiencies.

Applications and Industries

Photovoltaics, solar cells, photosensitive devices.

Technology Status
Technology IDDevelopment StageAvailabilityPublishedLast Updated
BSA 09-15PrototypeAvailable04/01/201104/01/2011

Contact BNL About This Technology

To: Kimberley Elcess<elcess@bnl.gov>