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NOVEL LUBRICANT ADDITIVES

Argonne National Laboratory

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<em>Upper, the functionalized nanostructures mixed with poly-alpha-olefin (PAO)-4 reduce friction as test temperature is raised. Lower, Friction coefficient remains unchanged at all test temperatures with PAO4 alone.&nbsp; </em><br />
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Upper, the functionalized nanostructures mixed with poly-alpha-olefin (PAO)-4 reduce friction as test temperature is raised. Lower, Friction coefficient remains unchanged at all test temperatures with PAO4 alone. 

Technology Marketing Summary

To develop more fuel efficient and wear resistant engines, advanced lubricants that perform better at high temperature are needed.  Since most lubricating oils begin to oxidize above 250°C, therefore solid lubricating coatings and self-lubricating composites are needed for higher temperature use[i].  Currently used engine oils may contain metal-based lubricant additives such as molybdenum derivatives for enhancing lubricity and zinc compounds for their anti-wear properties[ii]. Researchers have also considered carbonaceous particles, like nano-onions, nano-fibres and tubes, sub-micron graphite particles, etc.  These potential additives are all expensive, ineffective and hard to scale-up[iii].



[i] Erdemir, A. “Solid Lubricants and Self-lubricating Films,”, in Handbook of Modern Tribology ed. B. Bhushan, CRC Press, pp. 787-818, 2001.

[ii] Spikes, H. A., "The History and Mechanisms of ZDDP," Tribology Letters, 17(2004) 469-489

[iii] Martin, J-.M. and Ohmae,M., “Nanolubricants”, New York, JohnWiley and Sons 2008.; Matsumoto, N.,Mistry, K., Kim, J.H., Eryilmaz, O. L., Erdemir, A., Kinoshita, H. and Ohmae, N., “Friction-reducing Properties of Onion-like Carbon and Other Nano-carbons Under High Contact Pressure in Liquid Lubricants”, Tribology - Materials, Surfaces, and Interfaces, 6, 2012, 116-120.

 

Description

Researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory have developed a novel range of functionalized carbonaceous particles that are effective lubricant additives to oils, greases and fuels because of their unique friction and wear reduction properties, environmental benefits and cost and ease of production.

These functionalized carbonaceous particles are nanostructures with special composition and properties that distinguish them from their routinely available counterparts and have been derived from waste plastics using a patent-pending method. The lubricants prepared with mixing these proprietary patent-pending particles demonstrate significantly lower friction and reduced wear on interacting surfaces in various tests. Lubricant mixed with one of the novel carbon nanostructures show visible metal deposition on wear surface demonstrating potential for autonomously repairing the wear surfaces while in use.  These additives which are lubricity enhancers and wear reducers are under further development and testing under various conditions at the Argonne National Laboratory.  The additives can be incorporated into engine oils and other lubricants improving engine performance, fuel efficiency and engine life while reducing environmental impact. 

Benefits

These novel lubricant additives:

  • reduce friction between interactive surfaces;
  • reduce surface wear
  • repair interacting surfaces autonomously while in use
  • are suitable for higher temperature use;
  • are cheap and easy to produce.
Applications and Industries
  • Internal combustion engines; gasoline, diesel, jet and all engine types
  • Complex gear systems
  • Other machines
  • Windmills
More Information

This technology solely owned by the Argonne National Laboratory and it is available for licensing and partnership development.

Technology Status
Technology IDDevelopment StageAvailabilityPublishedLast Updated
IN-10-021DevelopmentAvailable07/16/201307/16/2013

Contact ANL About This Technology

To: Elizabeth Jordan<partners@anl.gov>