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Millimeter Wave Sensor Technologies Track Biometrics; Detect Chemicals, Gases, and Radiation

Argonne’s millimeter wave (mmW) sensor technologies measure a wide range of threat materials remotely

Argonne National Laboratory

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<p>
	<span style="line-height: 115%; font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;; font-size: 11pt; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;"><em><font color="#000000">Geometry of the scene used for the radiative transfer model, consisting of gas plume and background within a stratified atmosphere.</font></em></span></p>

Geometry of the scene used for the radiative transfer model, consisting of gas plume and background within a stratified atmosphere.

Technology Marketing Summary

Security threats come in many forms—airborne, radiative, gaseous, human, or infiltrative—and it can be costly and impractical to deploy a broad suite of detector technologies to identify all potential hazards in public places. Argonne’s millimeter wave (mmW) sensor technologies measure a wide range of threat materials remotely, making them well suited to many security, industrial and medical applications.

Description

Radar Detection of Chemical Leaks

Natural gas pipelines stretch over two million miles across the United States, and pipeline leaks can be deadly. Current leak detection systems are labor-intensive and costly, drawing air samples from specific inspection locations. Argonne’s radar technique uses millimeter waves to remotely detect and image aboveground natural gas leaks. The technique has potential for below-ground use as well.

Remote Passive Chemical Detection

All matter emits electromagnetic radiation. Argonne scientists developed a detector that focuses on the high-frequency waves emitted by chemical gases as they pass through the atmosphere. With a passive spectroscope, the detector uses millimeter waves to produce spectral signals. Because every chemical produces a unique signal, the device can detect the “signature” of dangerous chemical situations before they do harm. Beyond detection, passive mmW technology can also create images of targets detected through plume mapping. This invention received an R&D 100 Award in 2007.

Millimeter Wave Standoff Detection of Biometrics

Remote mmW detection tools can identify physiological markers through biometric data. For example, suspects in a crowd setting might stand out if their heartbeat or blood pressure were out of normal ranges. In health care settings, millimeter wave sensors can monitor real-time vital signs and movement remotely.

Benefits

Millimeter wave sensor technology has a number of benefits. It can function remotely, operate under realistic field conditions, and provides spatial, spectral and temporal data. Able to detect targets in crowd settings, it is portable for covert operations and is customizable and tunable.

Applications and Industries
  • Utility companies
  • Private landowner
  • Military
  • Safety, security, and law enforcement
  • Healthcare
More Information

Ready for commercialization

Patents and Patent Applications
ID Number
Title and Abstract
Primary Lab
Date
Patent 7,495,218
Patent
7,495,218
Passive millimeter wave spectrometer for remote detection of chemical plumes
Systems and methods for the passive measurement of spectral lines from the absorption or emission by polar molecules. The system includes mmW front-end assembly, back-end electronics, and data acquisition hardware and software was assembled. The method relates to methods for processing multi-channel radiometric data from passive mmW detection systems.
Argonne National Laboratory 02/24/2009
Issued
Patent 7,888,645
Patent
7,888,645
Passive millimeter wave spectrometer for remote detection of chemical plumes
Systems and methods for the passive measurement of spectral lines from the absorption or emission by polar molecules. The system includes mmW front-end assembly, back-end electronics, and data acquisition hardware and software was assembled. The method relates to methods for processing multi-channel radiometric data from passive mmW detection systems.
Argonne National Laboratory 02/15/2011
Issued
Application 20100290063
Application
20100290063
MILLIMETER WAVE SENSOR FOR FAR-FIELD STANDOFF VIBROMETRY
A millimeter wavelength (MMW) measurement system for remote detection of object characteristics and methods for detecting such characteristics. The MMW measurement system comprises a front-end and an optional signal conditioning component. The MMW front-end includes an oscillator, a transceiver portion, and an antenna for focusing a detection component comprising micrometer level wavelength electromagnetic radiation onto the object. A portion of the electromagnetic radiation reflected by the object is received by the MMW measurement system, which is indicative of a displacement of the object. The MMW system may be configured to detect micrometer level displacement of the object disposed tens of meters from the MMW measurement system. In various embodiments the object may be a natural object, including a human, and the displacement may be indicative of a heart rate and/or a respiratory function.
Argonne National Laboratory 04/29/2010
Filed
Application 20120186344
Application
20120186344
METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR DETERMINING NON-UNIFORMITY CHARACTERISTICS OF A VEHICLE TIRE AND RIM
A method and system for a wheel assembly service system are provided. The system includes a rotatable spindle configured to receive a wheel assembly wherein the wheel assembly includes at least a rim and a tire. The system further includes a load device configured to apply a load to the tire during a rotation of the wheel assembly on the spindle, and a controller configured to determine a first force variation vector of the wheel assembly, prompt a user to rotate the tire with respect to the rim, determine a second force variation vector of the wheel assembly with the tire rotated with respect to the rim, and determine a force variation of at least one of the tire and the wheel using the first and second force variation vectors. The system also outputs at least one of the determined force variation vector values.
03/28/2012
Filed
Technology Status
Technology IDDevelopment StageAvailabilityPublishedLast Updated
IN-06-001, IN-12-004, IN-08-041PrototypeAvailable04/15/201304/15/2013

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