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United States Patent Application

View the Complete Application at the US Patent & Trademark Office
Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.
Hsu, Chia Wei (Cambridge, MA), Qiu, Wenjun (Chicago, IL), Zhen, Bo (Cambridge, MA), Shapira, Ofer (Cambridge, MA), Soljacic, Marin (Belmont, MA)
15/ 090,348
April 4, 2016
GOVERNMENT SUPPORT [0005] This invention was made with government support under Grant No. DMR0819762 awarded by the National Science Foundation and under Contract No. W911NF-07-D-0004 awarded by the Army Research Office and under Grant Nos. DE-SC0001299 and DE-FG02-09ER46577 awarded by the Department of Energy. The government has certain rights in the invention.